Archive for 2010

4
Aug


What is intimacy and why are some of us so uncomfortable with it?

No single definition of intimacy can satisfy everyone, but here’s one that works for many people: intimacy is the feeling of being known. It’s a feeling that someone else knows your true self, and the trust that there’s a joint commitment to maintaining your connection even when it’s difficult.

Intimacy takes many forms: verbal, physical, sexual, spiritual. A relationship is all the more powerful — and intimate — when it features more than one of these forms.

Unfortunately, people may focus on different aspects of intimacy. I often hear couples complain that one is only interested in sex while the other is only interested in talking.

Everyone needs intimacy. It is so stressful for people to feel isolated that they inevitably find ways of connecting with others — even if it’s only over whiskey with strangers in a bar.

Not everyone is aware that they need intimacy. Some people are so defended against their fear of dependence, exposure or loss, that they truly believe they need no one. Sadly, they are just fooling themselves.

When relationships are troubled by serious problems with sex, affection, nagging or chronic conflict, the cause is frequently a power struggle about intimacy.

What forms will it take? What are acceptable limits? What will people have to pay in order to get what they need? In healthy relationships, people discuss these questions in various ways, and they are flexible enough to accommodate each other’s needs.

In unhealthy relationships, people attack, criticize and blame each other for the mess they’re in, rather than seeing their mess as a joint creation.

People face a fundamental dilemma: we need intimacy, but we’re afraid of it. The way in which we handle this internal struggle defines our personality and relationship style.

Popularity: unranked [?]

Category : Blog
28
Jul


How can you get closer to the one you’re with? By understanding the many ways to ignite intimacy.

Intimacy takes many forms: verbal, physical, sexual, spiritual, says Klein. A relationship is all the more powerful — and intimate — when it features more than one of these forms.

Begin your exploration of intimacy with the verbal variety. There are two revealing questions you must first ask of yourself, and then a third you must ask of a loved one.

Once you’ve considered your feelings about getting close, you’re ready to hear the truth about intimacy. Everyone from Oprah to your best friend to Aunt Mabel has a different definition of it, and they’re not always right.

After you put the myths about intimacy aside, you’re ready to draw your partner closer. Spend time getting to know your partner’s dreams and desires. Learn to nurture your relationship, and you’ll keep the sparks flying.

Enough talking. Isn’t sex a part of intimacy? Our readers want to know and we have the answer.

If there’s one thing sure to spoil intimacy, it’s jealously. While occasional pangs of the stuff are natural in most loving relationships,persistent jealously will put out the flame in hearts once afire.

Popularity: unranked [?]

Category : Blog
21
Jul


There’s something unusual about Richard Brent. It’s not that he’s been married for 16 years, nor that he doesn’t drink or smoke, or that he’s 40 and still sexually very fit. It’s neither his performance, nor his prowess that make him the subject of this story as well as a document of scientific research. It is rather the uniqueness of his experience of sex that makes Brent unusual.

For as long as he can remember, Richard Brent has been multiorgasmic.

Richard Brent:

I think I started masturbating when I was 4. I didn’t ejaculate, but I thought Hey, this feels good, why stop, let’s have another one. I mean, it’s like a roller-coaster ride. Why get off if you don’t have to? I didn’t realize until my early 20s that it was any different for anyone else.

Many men covet a woman’s natural capacity to have more than one orgasm. Some envy it so much that they pursue techniques promising to bring them to orgasm without ejaculating. Most involve isolating the pelvic muscles and squeezing them right at the point of ejaculation. Does mastering these techniques make a man multiorgasmic?

Richard Brent: “Erection and Ejaculation Are Two Different Things”

I used to listen to guys talk about how many times they could get it up in a night. When they came around to me, I said, Do you mean how many times can I come, or how many erections can I have? Because for me that’s two different things.

Brent calls the multiple orgasms he experiences uninhibited pleasure. He uses no techniques or tricks to stop himself from ejaculating as he experiences orgasm. A full ejaculation follows each and every orgasm. Brent’s sexual experience challenges the traditional concept of the male refractory period or down time, during which a man loses his erection and must wait before he can perform again sexually.

Richard Brent: “I Don’t Have to Work at It”

It’s not the same thing if you have to work at it. I’ve tried all the techniques and I know it’s not the same. All those methods involve interrupting pleasure. Men don’t like interrupting their pleasure. All men would rather they weren’t limited by the Male Refractory Period (MRP), and were capable of effortless multiple orgasm, possessing the same sexual potential and capacity as do females! After several orgasms, I get a natural high, probably from the release of endorphins.

Popularity: unranked [?]

Category : Blog
G Spot | About Us | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | Sitemap